The Grammy Award-Winning Los Lobos and Renowned Ballet Folklorico Mexicano Unite in “Fiesta Mexico-Americana: A Celebration of Mexican-American Heritage” at the MAC Feb. 21

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Glen Ellyn, Ill. – The Grammy Award-winning Los Lobos and critically acclaimed dance company Ballet Folklorico Mexicano unite for the exclusive Chicago area engagement  of the national tour of “Fiesta Mexico-Americana, A Celebration of Mexican-American Heritage” coming to the McAninch Arts Center, 425 Fawell Blvd., Sunday, Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m. Traditional Mexican folkloric music with songs performed in Spanish, combine with dance and film in this all-new multi-media celebration highlighting the many notable achievements and contributions of Mexican-Americans throughout U.S. History. A free pre-show MAC chat discussion precedes the performance at 6:30 p.m.

More than three decades have passed since Los Lobos released their debut album, “Just Another Band from East L.A.” Since then, they have repeatedly disproven that they are “just another” anything, but rather a band that has consistently evolved artistically while never losing sight of their humble roots.Los Lobos was formed in 1973 by Hidalgo and percussionist Perez. They recruited their high school friends, guitarist Cesar Rosas and bassist Conrad Lozano and group started playing different styles of music including hard rock and free jazz. They later began exploring Mexican folk music that they grew up with, and they found themselves playing regularity at weddings, parties, and local Mexican restaurants in East Los Angeles. Los Lobos became more popular after they struck up a friendship with and opened for the rock & roll/cowpunk band the Blasters. Los Lobos went on to develop their own following of fans, especially after their presence on the soundtrack of the 1982 cult comedy film, “Eating Raoul.”

In 1983, Los Lobos signed a record deal with Slash Records an L.A. indie record label distributed by Warner Bros. Producer T-Bone Burnett brought saxophone player Steve Berlin into the group. Los Lobos released many songs that turned into hits including “How Will The Wolf Survive,” “La Bamba,” and “Down On The Riverbed.” To date Los Lobos has won three Grammys including Best Mexican-American/Tejano Music Performance in both 1983 and 1989, and Best Pop Instrumental Performance in 1995. Many of their singles and albums topped the billboards charts from 1984 through 2010.

Los Lobos is Louie Perez (Drums, Guitars, Percussion, Vocals); Steve Berlin (Saxophone, Percussion, Flute, Midsax, Harmonica, Melodica), Cesar Rosas (Vocals, Guitar, Mandolin), Conrad Lozano (Bass, Guitarron, Vocals), David Hidalgo (Vocals, Guitar, Accordion, Percussion, Bass, Keyboards, Melodica, Drums, Violin, Banjo) and Enrique “Bugs” Gonzalez (Drums/Percussion).

Founded in 1967 by Carlos Moreno Samaniego, and currently under the direction of his son Carlos Garcia Moreno, Ballet Folklorico Mexicano’s  mission is to empower the community and to educate the general public by providing a greater understanding and appreciation for Mexican culture and folklore through music, dance and traditional art forms. For nearly 50 years, the company has performed in major venues, professional sports events, popular TV shows, and cultural festivals throughout the United States and internationally.

Ballet Folklorico Mexicano  has a dance repertoire of more than 120 pieces that represent the Mexican culture. Many of the pieces are presented in their traditional form while others have been restaged into contemporary choreography.  In this way, the indigenous rhythms of Tarascan Indian dances from central Mexico stand in sharp contrast to the Spanish military; and courtship dances from that region. Similarly the African influences that characterize dances from the Gulf of Mexico are juxtaposed by Mexican polkas that mark the influence of eastern European from the north.

Tickets

Glen Ellyn’s McAninch Arts Center, located at 425 Fawell Blvd., presents “Fiesta Mexico-Americana,” featuring Los Lobos with special guests Ballet Folklorico Mexicano on Sunday Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $55-$66. For tickets or more information, call 630.942.4000 or visit AtTheMAC.org. A free pre-show MAC chat discussion precedes the performance at 6:30 p.m.

Community Sponsor for Fiesta Mexico-Americana, A Celebration of Mexican-American Heritage” is Instituto Cervantes of Chicago; Wansas Tequila is a promotional partner.

About the MAC

McAninch Arts Center (MAC) at College of DuPage is located 25 miles west of Chicago near I-88 and I-355,  and houses three performance spaces (the 780-seat proscenium Belushi Performance Hall; the 186-seat soft-thrust Playhouse Theatre; and the versatile black box Studio Theatre), plus the Cleve Carney Art Gallery, classrooms for the college’s academic programming and the Lakeside Pavilion. The MAC has presented theater, music, dance and visual art to more than 1.5 million people since its opening in 1986 and typically welcomes more than 75,000 patrons from the greater Chicago area to more than 230 performances each season.

The mission of the MACis to foster enlightened educational and performance opportunities, which encourage artistic expression, establish a lasting relationship between people and art, and enrich the cultural vitality of the community. For more information about the MAC, visit AtTheMAC.org. You can also learn more about the MAC on Facebook at facebook.com/AtTheMAC or on twitter at twitter.com/AtTheMAC.

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The MAC’s 2015-2016 Season is made possible in part with support by Arts Midwest, BMO Harris Bank,

The DuPage Foundation, Hilton of Lisle/Naperville, WDCB 90.9 FM and the College of DuPage Foundation.

Established as a 501(c) 3 not-for-profit charitable organization in 1967, the College of DuPage Foundation raises monetary and in-kind gifts to increase access to education and to enhance cultural opportunities for the surrounding community. For more information about the College of DuPage Foundation, visit foundation.cod.edu or call 630.942.2462.

Programs at the MAC are partially supported through a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency.